Hurricane Fiona will be ‘a storm to remember,’ with severe impact on Atlantic provinces expected: experts

In this article, you will get all the information regarding Hurricane Fiona will be ‘a storm to remember,’ with severe impact on Atlantic provinces expected: experts

Article content

Hurricane Fiona was 708 kilometres south-southwest of Sable Island on Friday afternoon, tracking north with wind speeds of 204 kilometres per hour.

Article content

Ian Hubbard, a meteorologist with the Canadian Hurricane Centre, said Fiona gained some intensity on Friday morning and as of noon was considered a Category 4 hurricane, but was still forecast to hit the Maritimes as a post-tropical storm.

Article content

Hubbard said the impact is expected to be severe. “It’s definitely going to be a storm to remember.”

While central Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island are in Fiona’s direct path and expected to be worst hit, wind and storm surge warnings remain in effect for eastern New Brunswick and the Acadian Peninsula. Southeastern New Brunswick is expected to get between 60 and 80 mm of rain and wind gusts up to 100 km an hour.

The highest rainfall amounts are likely for eastern Nova Scotia, southwestern Newfoundland, and the Gulf of St. Lawrence region, Environment Canada stated.

Article content

Speaking to the media on Thursday, New Brunswick Public Safety Minister Bill Hogan said the southeastern corner of the province and the Acadian shores will take the brunt of the storm in N.B., with Miramichi Bay likely to see high water levels as well.

“We can expect some damage,” Hogan said. “We shouldn’t take it lightly.”

Environment Canada said in on its website Friday afternoon that Fiona is expected to make landfall near Canso and pass through western Cape Breton Saturday morning before reaching the Quebec lower north shore and southeastern Labrador by early Sunday.

Winds were forecast to increase through Friday evening with rain continuing until Saturday afternoon. Most of the heavy winds will blow through overnight, Hubbard said.

Article content

With most trees still in full foliage, Hubbard said that could mean more broken branches or fallen trees than if the storm arrived later in the fall when leaves had fallen, which allows winds to more easily pass through.

He also noted the storm arrives following several days of rain. “If the ground is very moist, it obviously makes it more likely it’s unable to absorb some moisture,” he said, increasing the potential for flooding.

On Thursday, Environment Canada meteorologist Bob Robichaud said Fiona could be as strong as Hurricane Juan in 2003 and Hurricane Dorian in 2019, which caused more than $85 million and $22 million, respectively, in damages, and knocked out power to tens of thousands of residents for days.

Article content

The 2019 storm caused millions of dollars in damage at marinas along the east coast of New Brunswick. At the Shediac Bay Marina alone, more than 40 boats were tossed from the water by Dorian.

“It was a real shock, but we learned a lot from it,” said David Redfern, a Shediac boat owner. “This year we took our boats out early.”

Estimated landfall times for Hurricane Fiona.
Estimated landfall times for Hurricane Fiona. Photo by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Gerald “Gerry” O’Brien, manager of the Shediac Bay Yacht Club said Friday most boats were out of the water ahead of the storm. “Everything’s in good shape,” he said.

Two cruise ships scheduled to visit the Port of Saint John over the weekend have cancelled planned stops, while a third will make an unscheduled visit.

“We’re monitoring the forecast and making decisions as the storm develops,” said Jane Burchill, spokesperson for Port Saint John, noting “each cruise line is making decisions about where it makes sense to seek safety from the path of the hurricane.

“We’ve had a few cancellations … and one addition of a small cruise ship [arriving Saturday].”

According to the port’s cruise schedule, Celebrity Summit, with a passenger capacity of 2,038, and Caribbean Princess, with a passenger capacity of 3,100, will no longer dock in Saint John on Saturday.

— With additional reporting by Sean Mott

A person shields themselves with an umbrella while walking along the Halifax waterfront as rain falls ahead of Hurricane Fiona making landfall, Sept. 23, 2022.
A person shields themselves with an umbrella while walking along the Halifax waterfront as rain falls ahead of Hurricane Fiona making landfall, Sept. 23, 2022. Photo by Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press

Hurricane Fiona will be ‘a storm to remember,’ with severe impact on Atlantic provinces expected: experts

For more visit ReportedCrime.com

Latest News by ReportedCrime.com

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: